Rosa Carnota

Rosa Carnota

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3D reconstruction of the position of the "Lovers of Valdaro", two fossilized skeletons (a man and a woman) dating back to 6000 years ago, discovered by archaeologists at a Neolithic tomb in S.Giorgio near Mantova, Italy, in 2007.

reconstruction of the position of the "Lovers of Valdaro", two fossilized skeletons (a man and a woman) dating back approx 6000 years. Discovery by archaeologists at a Neolithic tomb in S.Giorgio near Mantova, Italy, in

#DigitalSignage

Museum invites visitors to unwrap a mummy virtually. Using digital interaction, this allows viewers to engage and participate more. Making it more fun educationally providing greater insights supported by visuals.

Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis, Tenn.

Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis, Tenn. When my sisters were visiting me, I took them to Elmwood to do some genealogy research and we got locked in because they closed the gates 15 minutes early. Called the groundskeeper who came to our rescue.

Understanding Humans: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology.

Understanding Humans: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology.

American Journal of Physical Anthropology. New availability: 1918-1995

American Journal of Physical Anthropology. New availability:

The last English king to die in battle, Richard had been buried five centuries earlier with little pomp in the church of the Grey Friars, all physical trace of which had long since been lost. Incredibly, the excavation uncovered not only the friary – preserved underneath a council car park – but also a battle-scarred skeleton with spinal curvature. On 4th February 2013, after a battery of scientific tests, the University announced that these were the remains of Richard III.

The complete skeleton showing the curve of the spine (Richard III skeleton discovered in Leicester car park, formerly Greyfriars church. DNA comparison made with descendant of his sister.

An archer from Henry VIII's warship The Mary Rose is brought back to life, via facial reconstruction; the archer died on board the Mary Rose in 1545 (Swansea University). http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/478784/20130614/mary-rose-archer-facial-reconstruction-henry-viii.htm

The reconstructed face of the Mary Rose archer. An interdisciplinary team of scientists have reconstructed the face of a Tudor archer, almost 500 years after he drowned aboard Henry VIII’s flagship, the Mary Rose.