Lost Bird of Wounded Knee - A Lakota child survived the Wounded Knee massacre (29-12-1890) and was adopted by a prominent white couple... only to endure a life of racism, abuse and poverty. Her poignant story is told in "Lost Bird of Wounded Knee".

Lost Bird of Wounded Knee I A Lakota child survived the Wounded Knee massacre (Dec. and was adopted by a prominent white couple. only to endure a life of racism, abuse and poverty. Her poignant story is told in "Lost Bird of Wounded Knee"

Secrets of Native American Herbal Remedies: A Comprehensive Guide to the Native American Tradition of Using Herbs and the Mind/Body/Spirit Connection for Improving Health and Well-being:Amazon:Books

Secrets of Native American Herbal Remedies: A Comprehensive Guide to the Native American Tradition of Using Herbs and the Mind/Body/Spirit Connection for Improving Health and Well-being: Cichoke

Wikipedia: "When Black Elk was nine years old, he was suddenly taken ill...During this time he had a great vision in which he was visited by the Thunder Beings (Wakinyan), and taken to the Grandfathers — spiritual representatives of the six sacred directions: west, east, north, south, above, and below. These "... spirits were represented as kind and loving, full of years and wisdom, like revered human grandfathers...he saw a great tree that symbolized the life of the earth and all people."

Black Elk and Elk, Oglala of the Oglala Lakota, photographed in London, England in their grass dance regalia while touring with Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, 1887

Incredible, and still they don't have the right to vote!

Native America's Timeline, the last one about living anywhere they would like is alittle misleading since most stay on the reservations or nations for health care, family, lack of money to go anywhere else, many different reasons that the families are sti

Massacre At Wounded Knee.  Because of fear and white misunderstanding of the Ghost Dance, Spotted Elk's band of about 300 Miniconjou Lakota and 38 Hunkpapa Lakota near Porcupine Butte were detained and escorted five miles westward to Wounded Knee Creek, where they made camp. On the morning of December 29, 1890, 500 U.S. troops were sent into the camp to disarm the Lakota. An accidental shot set off the massacre.

Massacre At Wounded Knee. Because of fear and white misunderstanding of the Ghost Dance, Spotted Elk's band of about 300 Miniconjou Lakota and 38 Hunkpapa Lakota near Porcupine Butte were detained and escorted five miles westward to Wounded Knee Creek, w

Pretty Shield (1856–1944) was a medicine woman of the Crow Nation. Her autobiography was written with the help of Frank B. Linderman, who interviewed her using an interpreter and sign language. This book was perhaps the first record of the women’s side of Native American life.  The Pretty Shield Foundation is named in her honor.

Pretty Shield was a medicine woman of the Crow Nation. Her biography, perhaps the first record of female Native American life, was written by Frank B. Linderman, who interviewed her using an interpreter and sign language

This land, this soil is all the indigenous peoples of America's land. The Natives are the rightful owners.

USA It is all "Indian Land" ! You can never chance the history of it ! Two feather I know this isn't Cherokee, but still stands true, don't you think?

Wow I've never herd of a woman's headdress

Minnie Hollow Wood - Lakota Sioux Minnie Hollow Wood (ca. was a Lakota Sioux woman who earned the right to wear a warbonnet because of her valor at the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Nicholas Black Elk [Hehaka Sapa] (c. December 1863 – 17 August or 19 August 1950) was a famous Wichasha Wakan (Medicine Man or Holy Man) and Heyoka of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). He participated at about the age of twelve in the Battle of Little Big H

Quotes From Black Elk

Nicholas Black Elk [Hehaka Sapa] (c. December 1863 – 17 August or 19 August was a famous Wichasha Wakan (Medicine Man or Holy Man) and Heyoka of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). He participated at about the age of twelve in the Battle of Little Big H

Sacajawea. Stolen, held captive, sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians. She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back. She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas the Pacific Ocean. The explorers, said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable. She served as an advisor, caretaker, and is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness.

Sacajawea - Interpreter & guide for Lewis & Clark in with her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated thousands of miles from the Dakotas to the Pacific Ocean, carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back.

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