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“Rub it in” means “to talk about something you know will upset or embarrass someone”.Example: I know I made a silly mistake, but do you have to rub it in by talking about it all the time?Origin: This idiom is a short form of the phrase ‘rub salt in the wound’. Having an open wound is usually very painful but rubbing salt into it would hurt a lot and probably make you even more upset! Therefore, if you ‘rub salt in the wound’ or ‘rub it in’, you make someone feel more ...

“Rub it in” means “to talk about something you know will upset or embarrass someone”. Example: I know I made a silly mistake, but do you have to rub it in by talking about it all the time?

Idiom of the day: Hard nut to crack.  Meaning: A problem that is hard to solve or a person who is difficult to understand.  Example: Our product sells well in the States, but the European market is a hard nut to crack.

Idiom of the day: Hard nut to crack. Meaning: A problem that is hard to solve or a person who is difficult to understand. Example: Our product sells well in the States, but the European market is a hard nut to crack.

42 Easy to Memorize English Idioms Related to School

School idioms in English are popular with students and teachers alike. Have a look at our fun school idioms illustration!

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How to spend time wisely essay examples Essays - largest database of quality sample essays and research papers on How To Spend Money Wisely

“Carrot and stick” means “reward and punishment”.  Example: Our company uses a carrot and stick - more money is the carrot, loss of your job is the stick.

“Carrot and stick” means “reward and punishment”. Example: Our company uses a carrot and stick - more money is the carrot, loss of your job is the stick.

Idiomatic ways to say: He got angry

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