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Shellycoat- Scottish folklore: a type of bogeyman that haunts rivers and streams. They wear a coat made of shells that rattle upon movement. They are relatively harmless but will mislead travelers who wander onto their territory.

Random Creature Feature: A “Shellycoat” is a creature from Scottish mythology that is named for its coat of shells. This sneaky fae haunts rivers and streams, and enjoys pulling pranks on.

A Celtic Sword-dancer by KidaGreenleaf

While doing a little research on the Celts, I became interested in sword-dancing, which was a part of many religious rites, and was often a part of cele. A Celtic Sword-dancer

A brownie/brounie or urisk (Lowland Scots) or brùnaidh, ùruisg, or gruagach (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England (especially the north, though more commonly hobs have this role). It is the Scottish and Northern English counterpart of the Scandinavian tomte, the Slavic domovoi and the German Heinzelmännchen.

A brownie/brounie or urisk (Lowland Scots) or brùnaidh, ùruisg, or gruagach (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England.

Celtic Gods: Gods from many cultures drew as Comic book Superheroes

Steady My Sword by KidaGreenleaf.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Originally the concept was a female Celtic warrior invoking the god Lugh before rushing into battle. Steady My Sword

Each-Uisge - Far more dangerous than the Kelpie, the Each-Uisge (Ech-ooshkya), a Scottish demon horse, will eat its victims after tearing them into pieces, except for the liver, which they leave. Sometimes they will appear as a handsome man to entice young maidens to the riverbed or the seashore. He can be recognized by a distinguishable piece of seaweed in his hair.

swingingonthespiral: “ The Kelpie is a treacherous water devil and a supernatural shape-shifting horse of Celtic folklore, believed to haunt the lochs and rivers of Scotland and Ireland. It appears to.

Mons Graupius AD 83  “Agricola's Batavian infantry advances against the Caledonians”   Seán Ó'Brógáin

Mons Graupius 83 A. - Agricola's Batavian infantry advances against the Caledonians, a Pict tribe - art by Seán Ó'Brógáin

Pict warriors on horseback chase an isolated Scot into a deserted broch in Dalriada, Northwest Scotland in the 7th Century CE.

Pict horse-warriors chase an isolated Scot into a deserted broch. Dalriada, north-west Scotland, seventh century.

Between 400 to 900 AD, from withdrawal of the Roman Empire until the ascension of Anglo-Saxon rule, the land we now call Britain was divided under the rule of many peoples. These tribes were banded together loosely into four “kingdoms: ” The Britons, the Angles,the Scots and the Picts.

The 'kingdoms' of ancient Britain. Between 400 to 900 AD, from withdrawal of the Roman Empire until the ascension of Anglo-Saxon rule, the land we now call Britain was divided under the rule of many peoples. These tribes were banded together loosely

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