Bronze Age sistra (rattle)   North-central Anatolia  Early Bronze Age III, 2300-2000 BC

Bronze Age Sistra (rattle) North-central Anatolia -- Early Bronze Age III - BCE -- Metropolitan Museum of Art

Anatolian Sistrum

Musical instrument Sistrum from ancient Anatolia, home of various settled cultures since at least as early as Millennium B.

Sistrum (rattle) Period: Early Bronze Age III Date: ca. 2300–2000 B.C. Geography: Central Anatolia Culture: Hattian Medium: Copper alloy...

Sistrum (rattle) Period: Early Bronze Age III Date: ca. Geography: Central Anatolia Culture: Hattian Medium: Copper alloy Dimensions: x in.

An ancient Greek bronze chalcophone, a musical instrument, composed of nineteen bronze tubes suspended on wires between two vertical side pieces with spiral terminals acting as resonators.

An ancient Greek bronze chalcophone, a musical instrument, composed of nineteen bronze tubes suspended on wires between two vertical side pieces with spiral terminals acting as resonators.

Gold lunula, 2400 BC-2000 BC, Found in Ireland, , Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age    The British Museum

The Blessington Lunula 2400 - 2000 BC Ireland - Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age (Source: The British Museum)

Egyptian Sistrum

Sistrum, ancient Egyptian musical instrument associated with their their gods, specifically the female God, Hathor.

Minoan sistrum: A common musical instrument in Egypt, the sistrum was used to accompany singing and dancing. When a musician would shake the metal sistrum, the instrument’s discs would hit against one another and the loop, creating a vigorous rhythmic sound. This clay sistrum, measuring 7 by 2 inches, was found along with five others in a burial cave on Crete, at the remote inland site of Haghios Charalampos. It is dated to 2100–1700 B.C., during the period of Minoan settlement on the…

Minoan sistrum: A common musical instrument in Egypt, the sistrum was used to accompany singing and dancing. When a musician would shake the metal sistrum, the instrument’s discs would hit against one another and the loop, creating a vigorous rhythmic sound. This clay sistrum, measuring 7 by 2 inches, was found along with five others in a burial cave on Crete, at the remote inland site of Haghios Charalampos. It is dated to 2100–1700 B.C., during the period of Minoan settlement on the…

Standing warrior Period: Early Bronze Age Date: ca. mid-3rd millennium B.C. Geography: Syria-Levant

Standing warrior Period: Early Bronze Age Date: ca. late millennium B. Geography: Syria-Levant Medium: Copper Dimensions: H.

Shaft-hole axe head with bird-headed demon, boar, and dragon  Period:Bronze Age Date:ca. late 3rd–early 2nd millennium B.C. Geography:Bactria-Margiana Culture:Bactria-Margiana Archaeological Complex Medium:Silver, gold foil Dimensions:L. 15 cm

Shaft-hole axe head with bird-headed demon, boar, and dragon Period:Bronze Age Date:ca. late millennium B. Geography:Bactria-Margiana Culture:Bactria-Margiana Archaeological Complex Medium:Silver, gold foil Dimensions:L.

Sistrum ~ a musical instrument of ancient Egypt consisting of a metal frame with transverse metal rods that rattled when the instrument was shaken

*EGYPT ~ Sistrum ~ a musical instrument of ancient Egypt consisting of a metal frame with transverse metal rods that rattled when the instrument was shaken

This little vase was relly impressive! It was found in Zakros Ancient Minoan Palace, dated to 17th-15th century BC!

Minoan -- Rock Crystal Rhyton -- Excavated from the ancient Minoan Palace of Zakros in Crete -- Circa 1450 BCE -- Heraklion Archaeological Museum -- Crete

The Hakkari Stelae, Bronze Age. Thirteen stone stelae, of a type never before seen in Anatolia or the Near East, were found in their original location in Hakkari,Turkey in 1998. Carved on upright flagstones with only one cut surface, upon which human figures have been chiseled without legs. Eleven of the stelae are naked warriors depicted with daggers, spears and axes and a drinking vessel made of skin in both hands. Two stelae are armless women. 15th to 11th centuries BCE.

The Hakkari Stelae, Bronze Age. Thirteen stone stelae, of a type never before seen in Anatolia or the Near East, were found in their original location in Hakkari,Turkey in to centuries BCE.

40,000-year-old stone bracelet from Denisova Cave is oldest ever found = The bracelet is stunning - in bright sunlight it reflects the sun rays, at night by the fire it casts a deep shade of green

stone bracelet from Denisova Cave is oldest ever found = The bracelet is stunning - in bright sunlight it reflects the sun rays, at night by the fire it casts a deep shade of green

Faience Sistrum Inscribed with the Name of Ptolemy I. Ptolemaic Period, 305–282 B.C. Faience, H. 26.7 cm (10 1/2 in.) I Metropolitan Museum

Faience Sistrum Inscribed with the Name of Ptolemy I Period: Ptolemaic Period Date: B. Geography: From Egypt Medium: Faience

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