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Caoineag - A banshee like spirit attached to the clans of the Highlands, who could be heard wailing at the bottom of waterfalls before there is death or catastrophe within the clan. Her name means 'the weeper'. #scottish #scotland #folklore

Caoineag - A banshee like spirit attached to the clans of the Highlands, who could be heard wailing at the bottom of waterfalls before there is death or catastrophe within the clan.

Babice (Midwives) - Midwives are furious, and there’s no peace in fury. That is why they are revenging and venting their rage upon the most vulnerable, on those who are just the same as they used to be, exhausted by labor pain, by loosing blood and strength, on new mothers and the most unable, the weakest creatures in the world - upon babies. #Slavic, #Mythology, #Evil

Serbian Mythology - Babice (Midwives) by Vanja Todoric on ArtStation.

Maran Maran (singular mara, roughly translated as “nightmare”) are terrifying female beings that haunt people at night. They crawl upon the victim’s chest while they sleep, suffocating them and sucking out their life force. If you wake up, you will be breathless and feel as if you have been smothered.

Maran Maran (singular mara, roughly translated as “nightmare”) are terrifying female beings that haunt people at night. They crawl upon the victim’s chest while they sleep, suffocating them and sucking out their life force.

Bean Nighe - “Washer Woman”  Similar to the Banshee, the Bean Nighe is an omen of death in Scottish Folklore. he Bean Nighe are often seen washing the cloths...

Bean Nighe - “Washer Woman” Similar to the Banshee, the Bean Nighe is an omen of death in Scottish Folklore. The Bean Nighe are often seen washing the cloths “As the "Washer at the Ford” she wanders.

The Brollachan, (love that word!) a Scottish mythical creature said to take the shape of what you most fear. Has no true form.

The Brollachan - They're like Boggarts. Their original shape is a black mass with red eyes in the middle.

The Baobhan Sith, are a       strange breed of Scottish Vampiric entities. They most frequently manifest       as small groups of beguiling women, dressed in flowing green cloaks that       almost conceal the fact that their legs are of a form more befitting Deer.       They may also at times take the forms of Hooded Crows. Highland tales       relate how they may entrance men with their dancing before sinking their       fangs into them. The Baobhan Sith display a fear of cold iron.

The Baobhan Sith, are a strange breed of Scottish Vampiric entities.

# KELPIE - celtic myth: An evil horse that offered a ride to travelers but then turn its skin adhesive, sticking its riders to its back with no means of escape. It would then jump into the water and drown its riders.  Actuality: a myth created to scare travelers

kelpies scotland - The Kelpie is a supernatural water horse from Celtic folklore that is believed to haunt the rivers and lochs of Scotland and Ireland.

Selkie- Scottish myth: these are take the form of seals when in the ocean but when on land they shed their skin to become a human. If the skin is stolen then they can't return to seal form or to the sea which means they are stuck with whoever stole their seal skin.

Selkies and Subtypes : Daily MTG : Magic: The Gathering

A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women. The Gancanagh are thought to have an addictive toxin in their skin that make the humans they seduce literally addicted to them. The women seduced by this type of faerie typically die from the withdrawal, pining away for the Ganacanagh's love or fighting to the death for his love.

Six Celtic Mythological Creatures you may not know

A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women.

Wirry-cow- Scottish folklore: an elastic bovid-like ghoul that played the role similar to that of goblins. They were mischievous creatures, often playing pranks on humans.

Wirry-cow- Scottish folklore: an elastic bovid-like ghoul that played the role similar to that of goblins. They were mischievous creatures, often playing pranks on humans.

Each-Uisge - Far more dangerous than the Kelpie, the Each-Uisge (Ech-ooshkya), a Scottish demon horse, will eat its victims after tearing them into pieces, except for the liver, which they leave. Sometimes they will appear as a handsome man to entice young maidens to the riverbed or the seashore. He can be recognized by a distinguishable piece of seaweed in his hair.

swingingonthespiral: “ The Kelpie is a treacherous water devil and a supernatural shape-shifting horse of Celtic folklore, believed to haunt the lochs and rivers of Scotland and Ireland. It appears to.

The Urisk, or Ourisk, is a form of Peallaidh     - strange creatures that roam sylvan river-banks and other similar places in     Scotland. Unlike some other Peallaidh though, the Urisk is not a danger nor     a prankster. In fact the Urisks would like nothing more than to hold a     pleasant conservation with a human. However as soon as they enthusiastically     approach someone to talk, their unusual appearance generally causes humans     to run away in terror.

The Urisk, a Satyr like creature from Scottish mythology.

the dobhar-chu

Hey You, Dobhar-chu

In Irish folklore, the Dobhar-chu is a water creature that resembles an otter or a dog, and may be part fish. It is also a cryptid, and there are alleged sighting of the Dobar-chu as recently as Possible Puck sightings, while in the Northern Kingdom?

Valravn- Danish folklore: a supernatural raven with the ability that when it eats the heart of a dead person it can shapeshifting into that person. Once some valravn took the shape of a fallen king and led a whole kingdom astray.

The valravn is a creature with origins in Danish folklore. Valravne have many different appearances. Some take the form of a large, humanoid raven that can transform into a knight. Sometimes, they look like a half-raven, half-wolf creature.

Scottish myths: Wulver the kindhearted Shetland werewolf, via Scotsman. The Scottish Wulver hailed from the Shetland Isles.

NOT fitting in with the stereotypical image of a terrifying werewolf, the Scottish Wulver was a kindhearted and generous soul, known to help some of the most unfortunate people in the country.

Shellycoat- Scottish folklore: a type of bogeyman that haunts rivers and streams. They wear a coat made of shells that rattle upon movement. They are relatively harmless but will mislead travelers who wander onto their territory.

Random Creature Feature: A “Shellycoat” is a creature from Scottish mythology that is named for its coat of shells. This sneaky fae haunts rivers and streams, and enjoys pulling pranks on.

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