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Que mono

Que mono

Von der Decken's sifaka (Propithecus deckenii) is a sifaka native to Madagascar. Today, the Von der Decken's sifaka is listed as Vulnerable, but if habitat destruction continues in Madagascar it won't be long before it's

Silky Sifaka, Marojejy National Park, Madagascar – photo by Kevin Schafer – @schaferpho @natgeo. Every two years, specialists from around the globe survey the status of wild primates and vote for the “ World’s 25 Most Endangered Primates.” It is a fairly grim task, since many, if not most, of the world’s primates are threatened or endangered, many of them critically so. But it’s purpose is a vital one, to raise awareness of the plight of little-known species that are plummeting toward…

Silky Sifaka, Marojejy National Park, Madagascar – photo by Kevin Schafer – .

Madagascar, Lémuriens Sifaka

Madagascar, Lémuriens Sifaka

silky sifaka

Madagascar - The Lemur Conservation Foundation

Von Der Decken sifaka ( photo credit goes to owner )

Von Der Decken sifaka ( photo credit goes to owner )

Von Der Decken sifaka ( photo credit goes to owner )

Von Der Decken sifaka ( photo credit goes to owner )

Von Der Decken's Sifaka ( photo credit goes to owner )

Von Der Decken's Sifaka ( photo credit goes to owner )

Decken's Sifaka lemur (propithecus verreauxi deckeni) in the Grand tsingy. The Deckens range is restricted to Western Madagascar between the Manambolo and Mahavavy rivers.

Decken’s Sifaka Lemur in the Stone Forest

Decken's Sifaka

Decken's Sifaka

Von der Decken's Sifaka, vulnerable - native to Madagascar

Von der Decken's Sifaka, vulnerable - native to Madagascar

Photo FAB_5507.jpg by Fabio Bellavia on 500px

Photo by Fabio Bellavia on

Decken’s sifaka, Baly Bay, Madagascar.© Jonathan Jagot

Decken’s sifaka, Baly Bay, Madagascar.

תמונה

תמונה

One of the many species of Lemur found only in Madagascar

Picture of Dancing Sifaka (Lemur) seen in Madagascar stock photo, images and stock photography.

La survie des Sifaka soyeux sérieusement menacée    Un chercheur américain tente actuellement de protéger une des espèces de mammifères les plus rares du monde, les lémuriens blancs, aussi connus sous le nom de Sifaka soyeux.    Baptisés les "fantômes de la forêts", car ils semblent traverser les arbres tels des ombres blanches, les Sifaka soyeux ont élu domicile dans les montagnes du Nord-Est de l'île de Madagascar.

La survie des Sifaka soyeux sérieusement menacée

Silky sifakas, which live in the rainforests of Madagascar, are critically endangered, with as few as 300 individuals remaining. A team of biologists is undertaking an emergency effort to protect and study the primates. Photo by Toby Smith.

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