Berlin_Luftterror

Collection by Pablo Minuti

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The city of Berlin was bombed 363 times during Second World War. This blog shows historical pics of Berlin during and after the Allied bombing campaign; also USAAF and RAF crews and a/c www.berlinluftterror.com

Pablo Minuti
Berlin im bombensturm
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Berlin im bombensturm

This is a vertical photograph taken from 19,000 feet during a night raid on Hanover, showing an Avro Lancaster, silhouetted by the many incendiary fires below. That night 3,932 buildings were totally destroyed, and more than 30,000 damaged in varying degree, by the intense conflagration in the central and south central districts of the city resulting from this attack.  [Photo by No. 460 Squadron RAAF © IWM (C 3898).]

This is a vertical photograph taken from 19,000 feet during a night raid on Hanover, showing an Avro Lancaster, silhouetted by the many incendiary fires below. That night 3,932 buildings were totally destroyed, and more than 30,000 damaged in varying degree, by the intense conflagration in the central and south central districts of the city resulting from this attack. [Photo by No. 460 Squadron RAAF © IWM (C 3898).]

British armourers preparing fire-bombs (of 4-lb incendiaries Magnesium) at RAF Marham, Norfolk. Incendiaries were carried in an aircrafts bomb bay using Small Bomb Containers (SBC's) and were packed into cluster's. [Photo © IWM (CH 10710).]

British armourers preparing fire-bombs (of 4-lb incendiaries Magnesium) at RAF Marham, Norfolk. Incendiaries were carried in an aircrafts bomb bay using Small Bomb Containers (SBC's) and were packed into cluster's. [Photo © IWM (CH 10710).]

The bomb load most commonly used for ´area` bombing raids in the bomb-bay of an Avro Lancaster of No. 57 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. Her deadly cargo consisted of 12 Small Bomb Containers (SBCs) each loaded with incendiaries, in this case, 236 x 4-lb incendiary sticks. In the centre can be seen a 4,000 impact-fused HC bomb ('cookie'). [Photo © IWM (CH 18371).]

The bomb load most commonly used for ´area` bombing raids in the bomb-bay of an Avro Lancaster of No. 57 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. Her deadly cargo consisted of 12 Small Bomb Containers (SBCs) each loaded with incendiaries, in this case, 236 x 4-lb incendiary sticks. In the centre can be seen a 4,000 impact-fused HC bomb ('cookie'). [Photo © IWM (CH 18371).]

Armourers wait for the conclusion of an engine test on Short Stirling Mark I, 'OJ-N', of No. 149 Squadron RAF, parked at the end of the south-east runway at Mildenhall, Suffolk, before loading her with 250 lb GP bombs for a night raid on Essen, Germany. Each bomb has been fitted with a shackle to enable it to be winched into position in the Stirling's high bomb-bay. [Photo by Brock, F. J. (Flying Officer). © IWM (CH 5135).]

Armourers wait for the conclusion of an engine test on Short Stirling Mark I, 'OJ-N', of No. 149 Squadron RAF, parked at the end of the south-east runway at Mildenhall, Suffolk, before loading her with 250 lb GP bombs for a night raid on Essen, Germany. Each bomb has been fitted with a shackle to enable it to be winched into position in the Stirling's high bomb-bay. [Photo by Brock, F. J. (Flying Officer). © IWM (CH 5135).]

A WAAF (Women's Auxiliary Air Force) driving a Fordson tractor pulling a train of full GP-bomb trolleys at RAF Mildenhall. The size of bomb-bays in RAF aircraft and the perceived chance of a hit were both real considerations in this early period. During 1940, use of the smaller ordinance (over 2,000 20lb F; over 26,000 40lb GP; nearly 62,000 250lb GP) far outstripped that of the 500lb GP (just over 20,000). [Photo by Charles Brown. RAF Museum D 707906.]

A WAAF (Women's Auxiliary Air Force) driving a Fordson tractor pulling a train of full GP-bomb trolleys at RAF Mildenhall. The size of bomb-bays in RAF aircraft and the perceived chance of a hit were both real considerations in this early period. During 1940, use of the smaller ordinance (over 2,000 20lb F; over 26,000 40lb GP; nearly 62,000 250lb GP) far outstripped that of the 500lb GP (just over 20,000). [Photo by Charles Brown. RAF Museum D 707906.]

Armourers fit fuzes to 250 lb GP bombs on their trolleys, prior to loading into Handley Page Hampden Mark I, P1333 'EA-F', of No. 49 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. The initial British trio of bombers -Wellington, Whitley and Hampden- were lumpered by their small capacity of the bomb-bays and by the fact of being twin-engined planes, the more ton of bombs loaded means less fuel capacity. [Photo by Daventry, Bertrand John Henry (Flight Lieutenant). Imperial War Museums © IWM (CH…

Armourers fit fuzes to 250 lb GP bombs on their trolleys, prior to loading into Handley Page Hampden Mark I, P1333 'EA-F', of No. 49 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. The initial British trio of bombers -Wellington, Whitley and Hampden- were lumpered by their small capacity of the bomb-bays and by the fact of being twin-engined planes, the more ton of bombs loaded means less fuel capacity. [Photo by Daventry, Bertrand John Henry (Flight Lieutenant). Imperial War Museums © IWM (CH…

Groundcrew of a Polish Air Force bomber squadron, very likely of No. 300 Squadron, scribbling their best wishes to the enemy on a 500lb GP bomb at RAF Hemswell, 15 August 1941. The inscription in Polish reads: 'Warszawiacy Berlinowi - From Varsovians for Berlin'. 300 Sqn crews bombed Berlin for the first time during the mission made on 21 March 1941. [Photo: Imperial War Museums © IWM (HU 111733).]

Groundcrew of a Polish Air Force bomber squadron, very likely of No. 300 Squadron, scribbling their best wishes to the enemy on a 500lb GP bomb at RAF Hemswell, 15 August 1941. The inscription in Polish reads: 'Warszawiacy Berlinowi - From Varsovians for Berlin'. 300 Sqn crews bombed Berlin for the first time during the mission made on 21 March 1941. [Photo: Imperial War Museums © IWM (HU 111733).]

These series of posts will show the different types of bombs and explosives used in the campaign against Berlin by British RAF and American USAAF during the war and their deadly effect.

These series of posts will show the different types of bombs and explosives used in the campaign against Berlin by British RAF and American USAAF during the war and their deadly effect.

Other Pins

70 YEARS OF THE LUFTBRÜCKE 1948 - 2018 A group of curious Berliner kids and a woman with her little child are looking on as the cargo load is being lowered from a big US Air Force Douglas C-74 cargo plane, the only one used on the #berlinluftbrücke, as it was on trials. This photo was taken at Gatow airfield, on 19 August 1948. [Photo: National Archives and Records Administration.].

70 YEARS OF THE LUFTBRÜCKE 1948 - 2018 A group of curious Berliner kids and a woman with her little child are looking on as the cargo load is being lowered from a big US Air Force Douglas C-74 cargo plane, the only one used on the #berlinluftbrücke, as it was on trials. This photo was taken at Gatow airfield, on 19 August 1948. [Photo: National Archives and Records Administration.].

Here, three US airmen check the cargo load inside a C-47 Skytrain during the Berlin airlift. Many former US bomber pilots volunteered for duty in the Air transport command in the new born-USAF. Notice they even wear their WW2-era flying jackets, the patch on the shoulder on the men at extreme right identifies him as a China-Burma-India veteran.  [Photo: Harrington, D. Pioniere der Luftbrücke. Nishen Kommunikation, Berlin 1998].

Here, three US airmen check the cargo load inside a C-47 Skytrain during the Berlin airlift. Many former US bomber pilots volunteered for duty in the Air transport command in the new born-USAF. Notice they even wear their WW2-era flying jackets, the patch on the shoulder on the men at extreme right identifies him as a China-Burma-India veteran. [Photo: Harrington, D. Pioniere der Luftbrücke. Nishen Kommunikation, Berlin 1998].

70 YEARS OF THE LUFTBRÜCKE 1948 - 2018 An American Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, a massive-size cargo airplane, moments before landing at Flughafen Tempelhof.  [Photo: Harrington, D. Pioniere der Luftbrücke. Nishen Kommunikation, Berlin 1998].

70 YEARS OF THE LUFTBRÜCKE 1948 - 2018 An American Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, a massive-size cargo airplane, moments before landing at Flughafen Tempelhof. [Photo: Harrington, D. Pioniere der Luftbrücke. Nishen Kommunikation, Berlin 1998].

70 YEARS OF THE LUFTBRÜCKE 1948 - 2018  Berlin´s Neukölln children watching from a pile of rubble an American transport Douglas C-54 in her final approach to landing at Flughafen Tempelhof.  [Photo by Henry Ries / © NYT; Deutsches Historisches Museum Inventarnr.].

70 YEARS OF THE LUFTBRÜCKE 1948 - 2018 Berlin´s Neukölln children watching from a pile of rubble an American transport Douglas C-54 in her final approach to landing at Flughafen Tempelhof. [Photo by Henry Ries / © NYT; Deutsches Historisches Museum Inventarnr.].

• NIKOLAIKIRCHE • An old grave board, which was recovered from the ruins. Taken on 25 January 1951. [Photo: Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-09403-0012.] .

• NIKOLAIKIRCHE • An old grave board, which was recovered from the ruins. Taken on 25 January 1951. [Photo: Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-09403-0012.] .

This lateral image shows the Nikolaikirche ruins clear of debris and is dated August, 1955. The building had its roof and the tops of its towers destroyed as a result of Allied bombing. It was not until 1981 that the East German DR authorities authorised the rebuilding of the church. Notice at right the surviving Knoblauchhaus from 18th century (Poststraße 23), today is a museum devoted to the Biedermeier era (between 1815 and 1848) in Berlin. [Photo: Bundesarchiv Bild 183-G1122-0600-090.] .

This lateral image shows the Nikolaikirche ruins clear of debris and is dated August, 1955. The building had its roof and the tops of its towers destroyed as a result of Allied bombing. It was not until 1981 that the East German DR authorities authorised the rebuilding of the church. Notice at right the surviving Knoblauchhaus from 18th century (Poststraße 23), today is a museum devoted to the Biedermeier era (between 1815 and 1848) in Berlin. [Photo: Bundesarchiv Bild 183-G1122-0600-090.] .

This is the interior of the church ruine five years after the war. Inside the Nicolaikirche, there were many artistically significant funerary chapels and epitaphs. In the middle of January 1951, it was discovered that non-ferrous metal thieves in the tombs had made a mischief and stolen numerous coffins. Zinc coffins, jewelry etc. were stolen. These are mostly buried councilors and merchants from the 16th century.  [Photo: Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-09403-0003.] .

This is the interior of the church ruine five years after the war. Inside the Nicolaikirche, there were many artistically significant funerary chapels and epitaphs. In the middle of January 1951, it was discovered that non-ferrous metal thieves in the tombs had made a mischief and stolen numerous coffins. Zinc coffins, jewelry etc. were stolen. These are mostly buried councilors and merchants from the 16th century. [Photo: Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-09403-0003.] .

• NIKOLAIKIRCHE • Built between 1220 and 1230, and the oldest church in Berlin, the Nikolaikirche (St. Nicholas' Church) is located at the medieval Nikolaiviertel ('Nicholas quarter') area of the city. Originally a Roman Catholic church, the Nikolaikirche became a Lutheran church after the Protestant Reformation in the Electorate of Brandenburg in 1539. The original Roman building design was replaced by a modern style with neo-Gothic double-tower facade in the 15th century.

• NIKOLAIKIRCHE • Built between 1220 and 1230, and the oldest church in Berlin, the Nikolaikirche (St. Nicholas' Church) is located at the medieval Nikolaiviertel ('Nicholas quarter') area of the city. Originally a Roman Catholic church, the Nikolaikirche became a Lutheran church after the Protestant Reformation in the Electorate of Brandenburg in 1539. The original Roman building design was replaced by a modern style with neo-Gothic double-tower facade in the 15th century.

This is a vertical photograph taken from 19,000 feet during a night raid on Hanover, showing an Avro Lancaster, silhouetted by the many incendiary fires below. That night 3,932 buildings were totally destroyed, and more than 30,000 damaged in varying degree, by the intense conflagration in the central and south central districts of the city resulting from this attack.  [Photo by No. 460 Squadron RAAF © IWM (C 3898).]

This is a vertical photograph taken from 19,000 feet during a night raid on Hanover, showing an Avro Lancaster, silhouetted by the many incendiary fires below. That night 3,932 buildings were totally destroyed, and more than 30,000 damaged in varying degree, by the intense conflagration in the central and south central districts of the city resulting from this attack. [Photo by No. 460 Squadron RAAF © IWM (C 3898).]

British armourers preparing fire-bombs (of 4-lb incendiaries Magnesium) at RAF Marham, Norfolk. Incendiaries were carried in an aircrafts bomb bay using Small Bomb Containers (SBC's) and were packed into cluster's. [Photo © IWM (CH 10710).]

British armourers preparing fire-bombs (of 4-lb incendiaries Magnesium) at RAF Marham, Norfolk. Incendiaries were carried in an aircrafts bomb bay using Small Bomb Containers (SBC's) and were packed into cluster's. [Photo © IWM (CH 10710).]

The bomb load most commonly used for ´area` bombing raids in the bomb-bay of an Avro Lancaster of No. 57 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. Her deadly cargo consisted of 12 Small Bomb Containers (SBCs) each loaded with incendiaries, in this case, 236 x 4-lb incendiary sticks. In the centre can be seen a 4,000 impact-fused HC bomb ('cookie'). [Photo © IWM (CH 18371).]

The bomb load most commonly used for ´area` bombing raids in the bomb-bay of an Avro Lancaster of No. 57 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. Her deadly cargo consisted of 12 Small Bomb Containers (SBCs) each loaded with incendiaries, in this case, 236 x 4-lb incendiary sticks. In the centre can be seen a 4,000 impact-fused HC bomb ('cookie'). [Photo © IWM (CH 18371).]

Armourers wait for the conclusion of an engine test on Short Stirling Mark I, 'OJ-N', of No. 149 Squadron RAF, parked at the end of the south-east runway at Mildenhall, Suffolk, before loading her with 250 lb GP bombs for a night raid on Essen, Germany. Each bomb has been fitted with a shackle to enable it to be winched into position in the Stirling's high bomb-bay. [Photo by Brock, F. J. (Flying Officer). © IWM (CH 5135).]

Armourers wait for the conclusion of an engine test on Short Stirling Mark I, 'OJ-N', of No. 149 Squadron RAF, parked at the end of the south-east runway at Mildenhall, Suffolk, before loading her with 250 lb GP bombs for a night raid on Essen, Germany. Each bomb has been fitted with a shackle to enable it to be winched into position in the Stirling's high bomb-bay. [Photo by Brock, F. J. (Flying Officer). © IWM (CH 5135).]

A WAAF (Women's Auxiliary Air Force) driving a Fordson tractor pulling a train of full GP-bomb trolleys at RAF Mildenhall. The size of bomb-bays in RAF aircraft and the perceived chance of a hit were both real considerations in this early period. During 1940, use of the smaller ordinance (over 2,000 20lb F; over 26,000 40lb GP; nearly 62,000 250lb GP) far outstripped that of the 500lb GP (just over 20,000). [Photo by Charles Brown. RAF Museum D 707906.]

A WAAF (Women's Auxiliary Air Force) driving a Fordson tractor pulling a train of full GP-bomb trolleys at RAF Mildenhall. The size of bomb-bays in RAF aircraft and the perceived chance of a hit were both real considerations in this early period. During 1940, use of the smaller ordinance (over 2,000 20lb F; over 26,000 40lb GP; nearly 62,000 250lb GP) far outstripped that of the 500lb GP (just over 20,000). [Photo by Charles Brown. RAF Museum D 707906.]

Armourers fit fuzes to 250 lb GP bombs on their trolleys, prior to loading into Handley Page Hampden Mark I, P1333 'EA-F', of No. 49 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. The initial British trio of bombers -Wellington, Whitley and Hampden- were lumpered by their small capacity of the bomb-bays and by the fact of being twin-engined planes, the more ton of bombs loaded means less fuel capacity. [Photo by Daventry, Bertrand John Henry (Flight Lieutenant). Imperial War Museums © IWM (CH…

Armourers fit fuzes to 250 lb GP bombs on their trolleys, prior to loading into Handley Page Hampden Mark I, P1333 'EA-F', of No. 49 Squadron RAF at Scampton, Lincolnshire. The initial British trio of bombers -Wellington, Whitley and Hampden- were lumpered by their small capacity of the bomb-bays and by the fact of being twin-engined planes, the more ton of bombs loaded means less fuel capacity. [Photo by Daventry, Bertrand John Henry (Flight Lieutenant). Imperial War Museums © IWM (CH…

Groundcrew of a Polish Air Force bomber squadron, very likely of No. 300 Squadron, scribbling their best wishes to the enemy on a 500lb GP bomb at RAF Hemswell, 15 August 1941. The inscription in Polish reads: 'Warszawiacy Berlinowi - From Varsovians for Berlin'. 300 Sqn crews bombed Berlin for the first time during the mission made on 21 March 1941. [Photo: Imperial War Museums © IWM (HU 111733).]

Groundcrew of a Polish Air Force bomber squadron, very likely of No. 300 Squadron, scribbling their best wishes to the enemy on a 500lb GP bomb at RAF Hemswell, 15 August 1941. The inscription in Polish reads: 'Warszawiacy Berlinowi - From Varsovians for Berlin'. 300 Sqn crews bombed Berlin for the first time during the mission made on 21 March 1941. [Photo: Imperial War Museums © IWM (HU 111733).]

These series of posts will show the different types of bombs and explosives used in the campaign against Berlin by British RAF and American USAAF during the war and their deadly effect.

These series of posts will show the different types of bombs and explosives used in the campaign against Berlin by British RAF and American USAAF during the war and their deadly effect.