Different ways to say beautiful

Helpful tips and tools for writing, inspiration and motivation. All items posted are made by me or. < writing tips + amazing synonyms

Idiom: A storm/tempest in a teacup - "Storm" is more familiar to British folks, "tempest" to American. And hey! With the American version, there's alliteration!

Idiom: A storm/tempest in a teacup - "Storm" is more familiar to British folks; "tempest", to Americans. With the American version, there's alliteration!

Have you ever seen the pot calling the kettle black? - Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) . For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu For ESL classes contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163 Kluceti@chesapeake.edu . www.chesapeake.edu

“The pot calling the kettle black” means “don’t criticize another person for a fault that you have yourself”. Example: You are accusing me of being lazy? That’s the pot calling the kettle.

30becbec1a57628d1152602e15420d6e.jpg 740×740 pixels

"Down the road" means "in the future". Example: Down the road, I’d like to study art or music.

cork english teacher

verbs to describe rain - Learn and improve your English language with our FREE Classes. Call Karen Luceti or email kluceti to register for classes. Eastern Shore of Maryland.edu/esl.

"Toss and turn" means "to sleep badly".  Example: If I drink coffee before bed, I toss and turn all night.  #idiom #idioms #slang #saying #sayings #phrase #phrases #expression #expressions #english #englishlanguage #learnenglish #studyenglish #language #vocabulary #dictionary #grammar #efl #esl #tesl #tefl #toefl #ielts #toeic #englishlearning

Rigirarsi nel letto - "Toss and turn" means "to sleep badly". Example: If I drink coffee before bed, I…

What to say instead of very...replacing gradable adjectives with ungradable adjectives/extreme qualities.

How to avoid using the word 'very'

Phrasal verb: “To make out”

English idiom with its meaning and an example: 'IT TAKES TWO TO TANGO'. One of a series of "Idiom of the Week" cards created by the American & British Academy (ABA)

Idiom of the day: Get cold feet. Meaning: To suddenly become too afraid to do something. Example: I was going to try bungee jumping, but I got cold feet.

Idiom of the day: Get cold feet. Meaning: To suddenly become too afraid to do something. Example: I was going to try bungee jumping, but I got cold feet.

Pinterest
Search