structure

Here is a good diagram of DNA. This shows where hydrogen bonds form between the nitrogenous bases to create a double helix. It is also handy showing what bases pair with each other.

"This Double Helix is a scientific model of B deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the most common form of DNA. DNA is a chemical carrier of our genes. It has an elegant geometric structure that allows it to store a massive amount of information. Every organism has its own DNA, and it is our DNA that makes each of us unique.     Beads representing Phosphorus and Deoxyribose are 15 mm wide and multifaceted, and beads representing nitrogenous bases are oval and flat, 25 mmX20 mm."

"This Double Helix is a scientific model of B deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the most common form of DNA.

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases

Circular amino acids table - much easier to use than the grid version

Circular amino acids table - alternate to the grid version

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: Uracil

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: Uracil

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the hereditary matter in cells that makes up the repository for genes. DNA's structure consists of sugar, phosphate groups,and nitrogenous bases in its nucleotides. These bases are cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine. Cytosine and thymine are classified as pyrimidines that have a single ring. Adenine and guanine are classified as purines that have a double rings. Adenine base pairs with thymine (uracil only in RNA), and cytosine base pairs with guanine.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the hereditary matter in cells that makes up the repository for genes. DNA's structure consists of sugar, phosphate groups,and nitrogenous bases in its nucleotides. These bases are cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine. Cytosine and thymine are classified as pyrimidines that have a single ring. Adenine and guanine are classified as purines that have a double rings. Adenine base pairs with thymine (uracil only in RNA), and cytosine base pairs with guanine.

My life, literally and figuratively.  Glad someone else calls them "nitrogenous base"s and has the directionality of the riboses and number of H-bonds right.    Just realized it's originally from IDT.  That explains it!

DNA is a polymer of nucleotides. Two polymers can join to form a double-stranded molecule (double helix) via complimentary base pairing. For more details go to the "DNA structure and function" board

This DNA is a teaching model; It demonstrates different structural units of DNA: Phosphorus, Oxygen, Deoxyribose, CH2 group, 4 types of nitrogenous bases and bonding molecules of hydrogen. Each unit is shape and color coded.

DNA MOLECULAR MODEL, TEACHING MODEL 20" (50 cm)

This DNA is a teaching model; It demonstrates different structural units of DNA: Phosphorus, Oxygen, Deoxyribose, group, 4 types of nitrogenous bases and bonding molecules of hydrogen. Each unit is shape and color coded.

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: Cytosine

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: Cytosine

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: Review Base Pairing

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases

What You Need to Know About the Nitrogenous Bases: Review Base Pairing

Basic Components of Nucleic Acids - Nitrogenous bases, Ribose and Phosphate group. The bases are Purines (A,G) and Pyrimidine (C,T,U). Ribose, Phosphate.    http://www.biochemden.com/basic-components-nucleic-acids-purines-pyrimidines

Basic Components of Nucleic Acids - Purines and Pyrimidines

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a complex organic chemical that participates in many processes. Found in all forms of life ATP is often referred to as the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer. When consumed in metabolic processes it converts to either the di- or monophosphates respectively ADP and AMP. Other processes regenerate ATP such that the human body recycles its own body weight equivalent in ATP each day. It is also a precursor to DNA and RNA. From the…

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a complex organic chemical that participates in many processes. Found in all forms of life ATP is often referred to as the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer. When consumed in metabolic processes it converts to either the di- or monophosphates respectively ADP and AMP. Other processes regenerate ATP such that the human body recycles its own body weight equivalent in ATP each day. It is also a precursor to DNA and RNA. From the…

DNA. The nucleotides are joined to one another in a chain by covalent bonds between the sugar of one nucleotide and the phosphate of the next, resulting in an alternating sugar-phosphate backbone. According to base pairing rules (A with T and C with G), hydrogen bonds bind the nitrogenous bases of the two separate polynucleotide strands to make double-stranded DNA.

Scientists: Alien Genes in Human DNA & Extraterrestrial Abilities to Modify DNA

Pinterest
Search