10 of the World's Most Scariest Places to Visit - The Death Railway, Thailand

The Burma Railway, also known as the Death Railway, the Thailand–Burma Railway and similar names, was a 415 kilometres mi) railway between Bangkok and Rangoon built by the Empire of Japan in to support its forces in the Burma campaign of World War II.

Burma Railway - Wikipedia

Burma Railway - Wikipedia

River Mae Klong bridge, Burma, 1943  About 180,000 Asian civilian laborers and 60,000 Allied POWs worked on the railway. Of these, around 90,000 Asian laborers and 12,399 Allied POWs died as a direct result. The dead POWs included 6,318 Brits, 2,815 Australians, 2,490 Dutch, about 356 Americans, and about 20 POWs from other British Commonwealth countries (the Indian Empire, New Zealand and Canada).

The Bridge over the River Kwai as a Amazing Tourist Attraction - The Kwai River Bridge or the death railway trip as in is known in the world,is a Thailand's historical tourist attractionthat was built during the World War II.

Burma Railway: British POW breaks silence over horrors - Telegraph

Burma Railway: British POW breaks silence over horrors

On the anniversary of the completion of the 'Death Railway', a British prisoner of war, now speaks for the first time about the 'appalling' conditions he worked in.

Burma Railway - Wikipedia

Death Railway - Burma Railway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Burma Railway, also known also as the Death Railway, the Thailand-Burma Railway and similar names, is a 415 km (258 mile) railway between Bangkok, Thailand and Rangoon, Burma (now Myanmar), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II, to support its forces in the Burma campaign.Forced labour was used in its construction. About 200,000 Asian labourers and 60,000 Allied prisoners of war (POWs) worked on the railway. Of these, around 100,000 Asian labourers and 16,000 Allied POWs died…

The Burma Railway, also known also as the Death Railway, the Thailand-Burma…

Japanese Forces - Burma Railway - "Bridge on the River Kwai".

World War 2 Photos - Japanese Forces -Burma Railway - "Bridge on the River Kwai".

A new addition to the series about the extraordinary men and women who have shaped Australia's history, including World War II hero Sir Edward "Weary" Dunlop  Sir Edward "Weary" Dunlop was an Australian Army surgeon during World War II. Weary was among the Allies taken as prisoners of war in Java and moved to Thailand, to work on the grim Thai–Burma railway.

A new addition to the series about the extraordinary men and women who have shaped Australia's history, including World War II hero Sir Edward "Weary" Dunlop Sir Edward "Weary" Dunlop was an Australian Army surgeon during World War II. Weary was among the Allies taken as prisoners of war in Java and moved to Thailand, to work on the grim Thai–Burma railway.

The ordeals of the POWs put to slave labour by their Japanese masters on the ‘Burma Railway’ have been well documented yet never cease to…

Suzy Henderson: Author Hilary Custance Green & Surviving the Death.

Burma Railway: British POW breaks silence over horrors - Telegraph

Burma Railway: British POW breaks silence over horrors

On the anniversary of the completion of the 'Death Railway', a British prisoner of war, now speaks for the first time about the 'appalling' conditions he worked in.

Fred Taylor, my father, captured Singapore, spent 3.5 years in Japanese PoW camps, including working on the Thailand-Burma Railway.

Fred Taylor, my father, captured Singapore, spent years in Japanese PoW camps, including working on the Thailand-Burma Railway.

burma railway - Google Search

Australian and British prisoners of war (POWs) laying track on the Burma-Thailand railway. The POWs working on the railway in Burma were all members of A Force, designated by .

burma-thailand death railway - Google Search

Map of the Thai-Burma Railroad from the papers of W Duncan

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