Nevado de Colima Volcano

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Nevado de Colima Volcano. On my last trip here 17 years ago I climbed this peak solo without a guide and was awed, but lucky to summit. I am now older and wiser and a father, so this time I hired the best local guide: Jupiter Rivera from nearby Comala. Tim and I met Jupiter at dawn in Colima and drove up the flank of the mountain on a dirt road that curved endlessly through verdant forest which slowly changed to mountain spruce until we reached the ‘base camp’ for the start of our trek.

Nevado de Colima Volcano. On my last trip here 17 years ago I climbed this peak solo without a guide and was awed, but lucky to summit. I am now older and wiser and a father, so this time I hired the best local guide: Jupiter Rivera from nearby Comala. Tim and I met Jupiter at dawn in Colima and drove up the flank of the mountain on a dirt road that curved endlessly through verdant forest which slowly changed to mountain spruce until we reached the ‘base camp’ for the start of our trek.

Nevado de Colima Volcano. The literal high point of this trip for me was an opportunity to take my 18-year old younger son, Tim, to the summit of Mexico’s sixth highest mountain. Nevado (“Snowy One”) at 14,600 feet or 4,450 meters is taller by a thousand feet than its close neighbor Volcan de Colima, which is North America’s most active volcano.

Nevado de Colima Volcano. The literal high point of this trip for me was an opportunity to take my 18-year old younger son, Tim, to the summit of Mexico’s sixth highest mountain. Nevado (“Snowy One”) at 14,600 feet or 4,450 meters is taller by a thousand feet than its close neighbor Volcan de Colima, which is North America’s most active volcano.

Nevado de Colima Volcano. This is the most difficult section: the final climb to the summit up a series of loose rocky gullies. Jupiter had supplied us with climbing helmets for this section and guided us up the best route until there we were on the summit ridge.

Nevado de Colima Volcano. This is the most difficult section: the final climb to the summit up a series of loose rocky gullies. Jupiter had supplied us with climbing helmets for this section and guided us up the best route until there we were on the summit ridge.

Nevado de Colima Volcano. This is the summit of the 14,000 foot mountain, marked by a sturdy iron cross. Michael on the left was our convivial Swiss companion on the climb, Tim is behind and I'm in the red shirt holding myself up after the exertion...

This is the summit of the foot mountain, marked by a sturdy iron cross. Michael on the left was our convivial Swiss companion on the climb, Tim is behind and I'm in the red shirt holding myself up after the exertion.

Volcano summit    www.AdmireMexicoTours.com

Volcano summit www.AdmireMexicoTours.com

Volcano summit    www.AdmireMexicoTours.com

Volcano summit www.AdmireMexicoTours.com

Volcan de Colima, Nevado's hyper-active brother volcano, is reflected in my sunglasses on the summit of Nevado de Colima. Thanks to Jupiter, our guide, for this arty photograph!

Volcan de Colima, Nevado's hyper-active brother volcano, is reflected in my sunglasses on the summit of Nevado de Colima. Thanks to Jupiter, our guide, for this arty photograph!

Nevado de Colima Volcano. The best time of year for climbing Nevado is wintertime when the air is clearer and the chances of crystal-clear views from the mountain are at their best. But this is also the coldest time of year and temperatures high up on the mountain can fall below freezing. Snowfall is a regular winter occurrence, although less so in these days of global warming. When there is a lot of snow on the mountain, Mexicans flock here to experience this weird frozen stuff!

Nevado de Colima Volcano. The best time of year for climbing Nevado is wintertime when the air is clearer and the chances of crystal-clear views from the mountain are at their best. But this is also the coldest time of year and temperatures high up on the mountain can fall below freezing. Snowfall is a regular winter occurrence, although less so in these days of global warming. When there is a lot of snow on the mountain, Mexicans flock here to experience this weird frozen stuff!

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